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Welcome to the website of the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. The society is an educational, non-profit that seeks to maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom, and a respect for our national symbols and American citizenship. We do this by perpetuating the stories of courage, sacrifice, and triumph of those who achieved our independence to inspire succeeding generations.

There are chapters of the Massachusetts Society throughout the Commonwealth from Cape Cod, through the North and South Shore, and into Western Massachusetts. Through these, since 1898, the Massachusetts Society has provided tens of thousands of people opportunities to give back to their community. If you are interested in what is happening in a particular part of the state, use the links below to write the local chairperson. Ask to be put on their email list or to attend a meeting to learn more.

To keep atmosphere fresh, most chapters have a "ladder" for a regular succession of officers, usually starting with Chairman and moving along on a three-, four-, or five-year path to President. This ensures continuity in the chapter and allows people to plan for additional responsibility.

Boston Chapter (Boston)

NameOffice
PresidentDaniel W Kraft
First Vice PresidentPaul Joseph Marcus
SecretaryBrendan Winn Merrell
Awards and Medals ChairJ Whitney Halloran
Membership ChairDaniel W Kraft
The people of Boston were most outspoken and violent in their reaction to taxes, threatening to harm British customs officials trying to collect taxes. As a result, the British quartered troops in Boston to protect their officials. Then, in 1770, the Boston Massacre occurred as British troops fired into a group of protesters, killing five of them. Later, in 1773 the British granted the East India Company a virtual monopoly on the importation of tea. In protest, a group of Boston citizens disguised as Mohawk Indians boarded a ship and dumped 342 chests of tea into Boston harbor. Parliament responded with the "Intolerable Acts" where accused Colonists could be tried in England, American homes were forced to host British troops, Boston Harbor was closed, and more. This resulted in the First Continental Congress, in 1774, which met at Philadelphia's Carpenters' Hall.

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at a variety of venues in Boston. Please email the Boston Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list. You may visit the chapter's Facebook page here.

Cape Cod Chapter (Harwich)

NameOffice
PresidentRobert Allen Gifford
SecretaryJames Duncan Berry
Awards and Medals ChairWilliam Terrence Murray, Jr
Membership ChairDavid Crandall Schafer
On June 20, 1775, a general notice was given to all inhabitants of Martha's Vineyard to turn out and assemble at Tisbury on June 25th to see what measures should be taken to guard against the Island's exposed position. A large majority was in favor of applying to the General Court at Boston for soldiers. The next step was: "To sound the minds amongst the young men to see who would join the volunteer corps of Edgartown." They soon found that nearly all were ready for the first act of the Revolution that stirred the ''Islanders'' was the attempt of the enemy to plunder the few houses on the Elizabeth islands. All were willing to send all their men to fight with Washington, and there was not a battle of the whole war from Bunker Hill to the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown in which a Vineyarder did not take part and do his duty.

Meeting Place and Times

Meeting of the chapter are held alternately at the 400 East Restaurant in Harwich or the Daniel Webster Inn in Sandwich. Please email the Cape Cod Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list. You may visit the chapter's Facebook page here.

Henshaw Chapter (Worcester)

NameOffice
PresidentChristopher Scott Tourtellot
SecretaryScott Elwin Tourtellot
Awards and Medals ChairJoseph Owen Gauthier
Membership ChairChristopher Scott Tourtellot
William Henshaw served under General Amherst in 1759 and was stationed at Fort Edward and Crown Point. In 1774 he was a member of the Provincial Congress which voted to enroll twelve thousand minute men. William became a commander of a regiment of minute men raised in Worcester County. In 1775 he was an assistant to General Gates during the Siege of Boston, and participated in the Battle of Long Island, August 1776. He was also in the battles of White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. The term Minutemen was coined by Col. William Henshaw, who said, "we must have companies of men ready to march on a minute's notice".

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at various locations in Worcester. Please email the Henshaw Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list.

Knox Color Guard (Statewide)

NameOffice
Color Guard CommanderJohn James Cunningham
Executive OfficerChristopher Scott Tourtellot
SecretaryDavid Hamilton Conkling
Safety OfficerAllan David Van Wert
AdjunctRodney Robert Ventura
QuartermasterEdgar Stickley Hoak, IV
PaymasterEdgar Stickley Hoak, IV
In 1775, General George Washington inspected a rampart at Roxbury designed by a 25-year old former bookbinder named Henry Knox and was impressed with the younger man’s abilities. Self-educated in engineering and military strategy, Knox soon became Washington's chief of artillery and eventually rose to the rank of Major General. Knox’s Revolutionary War accomplishments include leading the expedition to transfer sixty tons of captured British cannon from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston, directing Washington’s famous Delaware River crossing, and taking charge of the placement of the artillery at Yorktown. Knox’s service to the new nation particularly is distinctive in that he was both the last secretary of war under the Articles of Confederation and the first secretary of war under the United States Constitution.

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at various locations throughout Massachusetts. Please email the Knox Color Guard Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list. You may visit the chapter's Facebook page here.

The Old Essex Chapter (Manchester-by-the-Sea)

NameOffice
PresidentWilliam Thomas Ryerson, Sr
SecretaryHenry N McCarl, PhD PG
Awards and Medals ChairJoseph Owen Gauthier
Membership ChairJohn Thomas Manning, M.Ed
The 14th Continental Regiment, also known as The Marblehead Regiment, was raised as a Massachusetts militia regiment on April 23, 1775 at Marblehead under the command of John Glover. The regiment soon joined the Continental Army in June of 1775 where the seafaring men would man the boats during the New York Campaign and the crossing of the Delaware River during the Battle of Trenton. The men of the regiment only had year and a half enlistments and the regiment was disbanded on December 31, 1776 in eastern Pennsylvania. Most of the men would take up the more profitable trade of Privateers for the remainder of the American Revolutionary War.

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at the Landing Restaurant at Seven Central in Manchester. Please email the Old Essex Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list.

Old Middlesex Chapter (Concord)

NameOffice
PresidentJames Lee Holmes
Awards and Medals ChairJoseph Owen Gauthier
Membership ChairJames Lee Holmes
The Battle of Concord occurred in the late morning hours of April 19, 1775. After British soldiers fired on the militiamen of Lexington, and were frustrated in their attempt to capture John Hancock and Samuel Adams, they headed to Concord as their spies had informed the British Governor of Boston, Thomas Gage, that there was a large collection of weapons and gunpowder there. In the early hours of the following day, British soldiers set out in secret to confiscate the weapons and gunpowder and to capture the traitors Hancock and Adams.

Meeting Place and Times

All Chapter Meetings are held at The Colonial Inn, 48 Monument Square, Concord, MA. Please email the Old Middlesex Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list.

Plymouth Chapter (Plymouth)

NameOffice
PresidentWilliam Edward Battles, III
First Vice PresidentElwin L Spray
SecretaryRobert Steven Green
Awards and Medals ChairPeter Vance Crone, Jr
Membership ChairWilliam Edward Battles, III
Building a chapter from the ground up has always been one of the hardest and most rewarding challenges of the society. Members, potential members, and friends interested in American History are welcome to join the Plymouth Chapter to learn, and to become involved. We also invite applicants that are working on their papers, those without a revolutionary lineage, and those living out of state. We believe everyone has the potential to participate and lead with the right opportunity and tools in place - these are our marching orders! Bring a friend or relative to see what is in store.

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at East Bay Grille at Pine Hills Golf Club, "Tun Tavern", 54 Clubhouse Drive, Plymouth, MA. Please email the Plymouth Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list. You may visit the chapter's website here.

Pomeroy (Northampton)

NameOffice
PresidentThomas Philip Vincent
SecretaryPhilip Edward Johnson
TreasurerJohn Churchill Puffer
Awards and Medals ChairGeorge Edward Podmore, Jr
Membership ChairPhilip Edward Johnson
Western Massachusetts was originally settled by Native American societies including the Pocomtuc, Nonotuck Mohawk, Nipmuck, and Mahican. The first European explorers were English Puritans who, in 1635, ventured west from the Massachusetts Bay Colony settlement of Boston to the modern site of Springfield. In 1636, a group of English settlers—lured by the promise of a "great river" and New England's most fertile farmland—returned there to establish a permanent colony. In 1777, George Washington and Henry Knox selected Springfield for the site of the fledgling United States' National Armory. For the next 200 years, the presence of the Springfield Armory would help to bring concentrated prosperity and innovation to Springfield and its surrounding towns.

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at various locations throughout Western Massachusetts. Please email the Pomeroy Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list.

Robert Treat Paine Chapter (Taunton)

NameOffice
PresidentEdgar Stickley Hoak, IV
SecretaryKenneth Bruce Sterling
TreasurerPeter Vance Crone, Jr
Awards and Medals ChairJames Robert Klim
Membership ChairMichael Patrick Deignan
Robert Treat Paine, signer of the Declaration of Independence and a native of Massachusetts, was born in 1731. He was expected, by family tradition, to become a Minister. He received high marks at the Boston Latin School and was admitted to Harvard College where he graduated in 1749. He taught school for a while and then began the study of theology. Because of his frail health, Paine set out to build his strength by working on the sea. He spent some years as a merchant marine visiting the southern colonies, Spain, the Azores, and England. When he returned home he decided to pursue the law and was admitted to the bar of Massachusetts in 1757. He first set up office in Portland, Maine (then part of Massachusetts) and later relocated to Taunton. In the trials of British soldiers following the Boston Massacre, Paine served as associate prosecuting attorney.

Meeting Place and Times

The chapter meets at various locations in Taunton. Please email the Robert Treat Paine Chapter for information on the next meeting or to be placed on the chapter's mailing list.

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